Quotes . . . from Long-Ago Lectures

ash cave_rick anderson

Hocking Hills, Ohio

[Ash Cave, I probably took this Summer of 2005.]

  • “The Bradford Pear is the most over rated tree in the U.S”. –Dr. M. Cathey, 2/22/90
  • “Everything moves in life-so gardens should have . . . movement/motion”. –Jim Chadwick 2/91
  • “People will tell you what they want-but they don’t mean it”. –Jim Chadwick 2/91. Referring to Designer/Client interview.
  • “As civilization advances we become less and less in tune with nature”. –Robert Berkibile 2/15/91(quoting?)
  • “Knowledge is control over nature-old quote. Knowledge is empathy with nature-the new way”. Robert Berkibile 2/15/91

Finally Darrell Morrison from a lecture in ’91 on Characteristics of Natural Design:

  • Mystery
  • Intricacy Detail
  • Sense of Place
  • Change over Time
  • Sustainable Landscapes

Using the above 5 characteristics the Landscape Designer can create a Naturally Evolving Landscape.

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3 responses to “Quotes . . . from Long-Ago Lectures

  1. Wonderful quotes! If only people had listened about the Bradford Pear…which is still being sold because people ask for it….

    The part that gets me is that there are decent varieties of Pear out there;
    ***P. calleryana “Aristocrat’ the Aristocrat Pear, and
    ***P. c. ‘Cleveland Select’ the Cleveland Pear
    But the Bradford is(you’re correct) still getting planted. Not only are people asking for it, some certain folks are still spec’ing it.

  2. “People will tell you what they want, but they don’t mean it…” Amen to that!

    When I pulled this out the other day all I could do was laugh, it’s amazing how much it happens to me. People will tell me all kind of stuff about their property and actually mean none of it. It’s a job where you really got to read between the “thoughts”.

  3. Rick,
    I told you the Giant Duck Institute would continue to monitor you blogs.
    I couldn’t agree more about Pyrus. It should go in the Hall of Shame with Crimson King Norway Maple. The tight branch angles and weak wood are a recipe for ice and snow damage. The landscape life here for this tree is usually not more than 8-10 years in CT. In addition, the smell of the flower is enough to sicken you at the indoor flower shows in the Northeast in February where this plant is ALWAYS forced to bloom for the “paying customers”.

    Bill:
    Good to see the Giant Duck monitoring the situation, and appreciate you backing me up about the Pear. I’d also like to say that you chiming in with the Norway maple has clicked a few wheels in this here head of mine . . . I know, I know. Anyway I’m going to post about the bad trees and see if we can create a list for designers and homeonwers to stay away from . . . “The Duke of Duck” strikes again.

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